Leicester City, Brexit and Pokemon Go: 2016 mid-year review

This week’s post is from #chat2lrn crew member Ross Garner, an Online Instructional Designer with GoodPractice in Edinburgh. 

2016’s been a crazy old year. First Leicester won the Premier League, then the UK voted itself out of Europe. Now, children and adults alike are walking in front of cars and crashing into lampposts as they use their phones to hunt virtual Pokemon.

If you’d put money on any of the above, you’d be very rich indeed.

But are we any wiser this July than we were back in January? Or has the unpredictability of the past six months shattered our confidence?

On this week’s #chat2lrn, we’ll be asking how this year has been for you? How have your expectations compared to reality? How have your ideas changed? What has gone well? What failures have you learned from?

Here are three ideas to get you started:

We operate in complex systems

How did Leicester City overcome 5000-1 odds to top the Premier League? Sure, training played a part. But so too did management decisions, the culture at the club, the mistakes made by opponents, and no small amount of luck.

When you are designing learning interventions, how much do you consider the system within which you operate? Is training the answer, or are there other factors at play? Can the success of one team be replicated to another, or are other factors like environment, team dynamic or luck skewing the results?

In complex systems, where we have a big impact on some areas but less of an impact on others, do you need to nudge rather than lead?

Emotion trumps facts

Throughout the UK Brexit debate – and the US Presidential race – facts have been cast aside in favour of sweeping generalisations. Why do these generalisations stick? Because they chime with the real-world experiences of voters. Because voters have an emotional connection to the candidates and to the ideas.

When we’re developing a new learning initiative, is it enough that we think it will improve the performance of our colleagues or clients? Do our learners believe that? Does it make sense to them, in their context, without knowing what we know? How much do you consider our learners’ hopes, fears, or even their workplace happiness?

Fun matters

Pokemon Go had as many users in its first week as Uber had in 7 years. It makes over $1million in revenue every day. As we look at the seriousness of the world around us, it’s encouraging to see hundreds of people gather in one space to catch a pikachu.

But how does this help us as learning and development professionals?

Well, it tells us that fun matters. Yes, we do a serious job. And yes, performance at work is important. But that doesn’t mean that developing a team, and striving towards a common goal, can’t be fun. What can we do to promote fun? Can fun improve productivity?

We’ll be discussing this, and your own ideas, at our #chat2lrn mid-year review. Thursday, August 28, at 8am Pacific, 11am Eastern, 4pm BST. See you there!

What can our hobbies teach us about learning?

Today’s post is written by Meg Bertapelle, #chat2lrn crew member, instructional designer, mother, wife, crafter, and marching band geek who wishes there was more time in a day.
knitting - rainbow pom-pom scarf

I’m a knitter, and a crafter in general.  I grew up doing “crafty” things with my mom and my grandma (who lived with us starting when I was 5, and still lives with my parents).  I paint, draw, make jewelry and cards, and have attempted sewing. Pretty much, if it’s crafty, I am into it.  Of course, this can get a bit overwhelming 😉

digital scrapbooking

I have also, more recently, gotten into digital scrapbooking to help keep up with all the memories of my daughter’s early years that I want to save from the inevitable forgetful black hole that is my mommy-brain (and I am now obsessed, by the way!).

The first (and glaringly obvious) thing that my hobbies have taught me about learning is to just DO IT! Maybe have someone show you (or find a tutorial) the first time or two, and just get your hands dirty and try something.

Ask for help, or search Google or YouTube for tutorials, when you get stuck or feel like you could do better.

Go ahead and screw it up. If you can’t live with the mistake, start over & do it again, but don’t keep yourself from jumping in because you don’t want to “do it wrong.”

Don’t wait until you can “learn everything” about the hobby before you start – you can’t absorb the finer details until you try the basics.

The really great thing about learning and hobbies, is that we are already interested in the topic, and motivated to learn. We don’t have to figure out some contrived relevance to our real lives, we are seeking out the knowledge and skills required to DO the fun stuff.  Hobbies make us happy, and really that’s all we usually require of them.  As human beings we are happier and healthier being challenged, so learning is a natural and integral part of having a hobby.

And wow, if you can love what you do, do what you love and actually make a living at it, how much fun would that be?

Check out how Logan LaPlante has constructed his own education around this kind of plan:

And just for fun, 18 Important Life Lessons to Learn from Knitting [BuzzFeed]

What are your hobbies?

What have they taught you about learning?

Is it anything you think you could apply to your work?

Tell us in #chat2lrn Thurs Jan 30 8am PST/11am EST/4pm BST.  See you there!