Preparing for the future of learning

This week’s post comes from #chat2lrn crew member, Judith Christian-Carter B.Ed (Hons), M.Phil, FLPI, Chartered FCIPD. Judith is a Director of Effective Learning Solutions, a UK-based learning services company. You can find her on Twitter @JudithELS

Are you preparing for the future of learning and if so, how?   We all know of L&D people future-of-learning-jlswho stubbornly refuse to let go of what they hold dear, most of it historical and deemed to be safe. Some will say that “if it isn’t broke, then don’t fix it”, but the growing consensus is that L&D is broken and in desperate need of being fixed!  So, just how can it be fixed and how can we prepare for the future of learning? Inspiration for this post comes from an excellent Towards Maturity* report published earlier this year.

The fast changing world of work

Here’s the thing: we live in a world in which new working practices are fast emerging, new technologies are being adopted, flexible working patterns are becoming the norm, people are working in different locations and often in multi-generational teams. The upshot of which means that how, when and where people learn is also changing, which, in turn, leads to a new and different learning landscape. It is this new landscape that requires an accessible, agile and flexible approach to be adopted by all L&D professionals, as only will such an approach ensure that L&D plays a major contribution to the performance and productivity of all organisations.

For most L&D functions small tweaks will not suffice, it is major shifts that are required: “But for these shifts to take place, learning professionals must also address their own knowledge and practice, and to upskill and reskill themselves. They need to make sure they have the skills to listen, observe, question and reflect how learning can best support the delivery of organisational goals. They need to understand where and how learners are learning, and to understand the potential for all the different forms and channels for learning, and when to create and when to curate. They must be role models in the new learning agenda where close alignment to the business operation must be the norm.” (Peter Cheese, CEO of CIPD, 2016). So, what exactly do these “shifts” entail and, even more importantly, how can they be achieved? This is the focus for our chat.

What does L&D need to do?

We need to:

  • let go and move on
  • change our attitudes towards learning
  • ditch all those learning traditions that are downright unhelpful
  • always stay relevant to the needs of our learners
  • become facilitators, creators of network connections, social mentors, curators of knowledge and learning resources.

How can L&D achieve this?

We need to:

  • improve our “business” credibility
  • demonstrate our value, and help people to develop and build the skills they need to do their jobs
  • move to a more customer-activated strategy
  • respond quickly and work fast, and be accountable to our customers
  • demonstrate key behaviours – all based on actions and not just words. 

This is your task, if you will accept it, to join in and discuss these requirements on 20 October, 2016, and let’s see if we can generate ideas for some much needed changes in true #chat2lrn style.

*If you have time, check out:

http://www.towardsmaturity.org/article/2016/05/09/in-focus-preparing-future-learning-2016/

 

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Catching the Wave

This week’s post comes from Dr. Greg Ketchum. Dr. Greg is a former clinical psychologist-turned CEO and media workplace and career coach. He presides over an executive talent firm, providing coaching and recruiting for executives and Fortune 500 companies. A unique mix of psychology and coaching expertise gives Dr. Greg a great understanding of people and what it takes for career success. You can find him at 
TalentPlanet® | www.talentplanet.com, and on Twitter @drgreg. You can also find him in his KPIX & KRON TV Workplace & Career Segments on YouTube and his Workplace and Career Talk Shows from CNET & XM Satellite Radio.


Catching the Wave:

How to Catch the Wave of Massive Change Happening in Enterprise Learning and Development

Catch

Summarized from webcast delivered with Andrew Bateman at Human Capital Institute July 14, 2015

View the PDF of Webcast slides here: Catch the Wave or Get Left Behind

Rapid Development of Learning Technology:

The rapid development of technology enabled learning is driving major changes in how learning happens inside the organization and in the role of the Learning Professional. This evolution is causing learning leaders to confront and examine a number of questions about the future direction of learning within their respective organizations. Here are some of the questions that we will examine today.

  1. Traditional Vision of the Role of Learning: The traditional view is that the learning
    function assesses the learning and skill development needs of the organization and
    then either creates or acquires the appropriate learning resources to fulfill those
    needs. In this view the business leaders and their business goals are the main
    customers of the learning function.
  2. Emergent Vision of the Role of Learning: The emergent view of learning is that your employees are your main customers and that the role of learning is to help them maximize their potential. It’s best summed up by these quotes from Bridge’s
    website.

    1. “Rather than shaping your employees into a particular mold that achieves an
      organizational goal, L&D now focuses on helping employees reach and discover their potential — it’s about growth and personal aspirations.”
    2. “L&D now focuses on helping employees with personal growth and aspiration.
      Developments in collaborative, blended, and social learning help make learning
      interesting, engaging, fun and continuous.”
  3. What is Your Vision? Given these two starkly different visions of learning what is
    your vision of the role that learning plays in your organization now and in the
    future? Without clarifying your vision of the role and goals of learning in your
    organization both now and in the future no amount of dazzling learning
    technology will help you. This is the bottom line.
  4. You’ve Got Your Vision and Goals: Now What? Once you’ve nailed down the
    vision and goals of learning how do you make those key decisions on what kinds of
    learning technology, content, and programs you’ll deploy to drive your goals?

    1. The Fundamentals of Learning: With all of the advances in learning technology it’s easy to lose sight of the enduring fundamentals of learning. That is, how does the best learning happen, what role does learning play in each of our lives, why do we seek learning, do we learn better alone or in interaction with others, etc. These questions aim to look at how we’ve evolved as creatures and what role learning has played in that evolution. If we didn’t learn that certain plants are poison, or that lightning can kill you, or other things like that we would have never survived as a species. From this perspective learning is what has kept us alive as individuals and a species and that suggests that the drive to learn is as strong as any other native drive such as for food or shelter. This is a rich and deep area to explore: How do we learn? Why do we learn?
      • Darwin quote……“I believe there exists, & I feel within me, an instinct for the truth, or knowledge or discovery, of something of the same nature as the instinct of virtue, & that our having such an instinct is reason enough for scientific researches without any practical results ever ensuing from them.” — Charles Darwin.
    2. Mix of Modalities: What mixture of technology, in-person, classroom, social,
      self-directed, crowd sourced, casual, on the job, and other learning modalities
      will you employ and for which groups and individuals?
    3. Laying the Ground Work: Before you bring in any new learning technology
      what ground work do you need to do to ensure that the solution you’ve chosen
      is right for your organization and that you’ve set yourself up for success?
    4. Realistic Expectations of Learning Technology: What can learning technology do and not do? What’s realistic to expect as to the benefits both to the individual and the organization from technology enabled learning? What role does human interaction still play as an essential element in learning?
    5. Leadership Development, Bench Strength, Succession Planning: If learning is increasingly becoming an end user, self-directed exercise how do you achieve your goals for these three areas?
  5. The Big Question Remains – Engagement: Given all we’ve discussed, one of the
    biggest questions remains as to how you get your employees to engage with any of
    your learning solutions whether they be technology, classroom, person-to-person,
    virtual, or group based?

    • Our View: Building an engaged audience for your learning solutions starts with
      having compelling content, and with understanding the natural role that
      learning plays for us as individual human beings. Without either those building
      an engaged learning audience just isn’t going to happen.

So, what do you all think? Do you agree with these steps as a process to “catch the wave” of change?

Join in and discuss these and other questions during #chat2lrn this week on 28 January, 2016 at 08.00 PST/11.00 EST /16.00 GMT. Hope to see you there!

Trends, Goals, and Professional Development…Planning for 2016

“Ajay is a Chartered Professional Accountant and a Certified Training and Development Professional but considers himself a Workforce Revolutionary. Ajay is a 3-time published author with John Wiley & Sons recently publishing his third book titled, “The Trainers Balanced Scorecard: A Complete Resource for Linking Learning and Growth to Organizational Strategy” (http://amzn.to/c3Qsk0). He is also a multi award-winning writer receiving the 2014 and 2015 prestigious TrainingIndustry.com Readership and Editors’ Award for Editor’s Choice and the Top 10 most read articles. Ajay regularly appears on the #1 Montreal Talk Radio morning show discussing workforce performance issues.”

Visit his (uncensored) workforce performance blog, Workforce Revolution

The 35th anniversary of John Lennon’s death just passed but his words remain…“So this is Christmas, and what have you done? Another year over. And a new one just begun.”

Yes. Another year is over and what have you done? If you are unable to fully answer this question don’t worry, you are not alone. The end of a year comes upon us quickly and it is often difficult to reconcile considering the promise a start of the year offers.

Each of us begins every year with renewed vigor and energy then in the end, which we believed was so long away, comes upon us with little notice. If you feel deflated from the passing of another year I have bad news…another one is around the corner. But here’s the good news. If you don’t want to experience disappointment the same time next year then do something about it now.

Moving Forward By Looking Back

The first step to achieving your end of year expectations is to first take a moment to reflect upon the past year. Learning only takes place if you are able to recognize what you can learn from past experience.

Begin by taking inventory of your experiences in the past twelve months. Human nature is to focus on the mistakes rather than successes. Both provide valuable learning lessons and it is essential that you not repeat the failures and attempt to leverage the successes.

When reflecting, take note of everything you observed/experienced in the past twelve months. What were the fads disguised as trends? What were the trends that meant well but never delivered on their promise? What did you learn from them? What experiences did you take away? Answering these questions is key to achieving your next twelve months objectives.

Goal Setting Isn’t Goal Achievement

Reflect upon the goals you set. Did you set any at all? Disappointment is only measured based upon the goals you initially set. Otherwise your disappointment is a waste of time…the only disappointment you experience is why you never set goals in the first place.

If you did set specific goals at the beginning of the year then measure how well you’ve achieved them. I assume you’ve achieved some to your complete satisfaction, you achieved others to the extent to say you met them (but not to your complete satisfaction) and then there are the remaining ones that you didn’t achieve at all. Focus first on the ones you didn’t achieve and then the ones you could have done better achieving.

If you failed to set goals then you are solely to blame for your end of year ineffectiveness. But don’t wallow in the disappointment learn from the experience. Set specific goals for the next twelve months but be sure to set them up so you can track your progress throughout the year. And, never make it a shopping list of goals. Plan too many and you will set yourself up for certain failure this time next year.

Professional Growth Is Not Optional

Finally, take care of your own professional growth. It simply amazes me how so many learning practitioners I come across don’t place any effort into their own learning. How can you not practice what you actually preach unto others?

The second error many practitioners make is to be myopic in their development. Stop focusing on what you actually do. While it is relevant to maintain your expertise it is equally important to develop holistically. To be taken seriously by your leadership, think about complimenting your skills with learning that lifts your value and expertise to be more inclusive of ancillary concepts and roles.

Give Yourself a Year-Round Present

Christmas is around the corner. Why not be kind to yourself. Plan your 2016 with learning events and opportunities by subscribing and/or registering for courses and conferences throughout the year. This will guarantee your professional growth and lead you to reflect favorably when 2016 comes to an end.

We hope that the past twelve months have been good to you. What I mean by that is not only in successful attempts but also if you didn’t achieve your objectives. You must be able to look back on both experiences to add to your personal growth. My wish for you is to take these experiences and leverage them for a more fruitful and exceptionally successful 2016.

Please share your experiences from the past year with the #Chat2lrn community. What are the fads or trends that you believe added value or were a waste of time? What was your wish list from last year that you achieved or wanted to achieve? What is going to inspire you to achieve your goals in twelve months? Join us on December 17th, 8:00am PDT, 11:00am EDT, 4:00pm BST for a #chat2lrn discussing these and other questions.

Allow me to leave you with a closing John Lennon thought and my sincerest wish to you that seems appropriate for this post:

“A very merry Christmas, And a happy New Year. Let’s hope it’s a good one. Without any fear.”

Please take this Poll:

Do we take our SMES for granted?

Today’s post comes from Fiona Quigley (@fionaquigs), chat2lrn crew member and Unappreciated SMEDirector of Learning Innovation for Logicearth Learning Services. The chat serves two purposes this week.

First – to introduce you to a brilliant DevLearn 2015 session being run by our very own Andrea May, and her able conspirator, Dawn Mahoney.

Entitled, From SME Smackdown to Nirvana, you can read more about it here.

The session runs on October 1st and if any of you are going to DevLearn this year, I’d urge you to consider going to listen to these two fabulously knowledgeable ladies. Andrea and Dawn aim to try to get us out of the ‘kick the SME’ habit and see how we can really get under the hood of what makes them tick.

The second purpose of this blog post is to consider more fully the purpose, role and usefulness of communicating well with the SME.

So that is today’s question. Is the SME a gift that we undervalue?

A SME, in case you aren’t aware is a Subject Matter Expert. Traditionally, it is the person or persons that eLearning folks use to design eLearning content. If you talk to any instructional designer or indeed eLearning project manager, it won’t be long before they are sharing their ‘SME war stories’. In fact, along with the LMS, put a room full of IDs together, and most of the conversations are likely to include SMEs.

The SME is vital to the success of an eLearning project. It is the SME who sets the tone and depth of the content, as well as (hopefully) helping to provide an insight into the target audience. But it is often east meets west when it comes to ID and SME understanding what each needs from the other.

So this week’s chat, I’d like to focus on the relationship of the SME to the eLearning project, and to also think a little beyond the traditional purpose that most of us attribute to the SME.

What is it all about?

If you think about what we demand or need from a SME, it is a bit of a tall order. First and foremost, the SME has a day job. Secondly, they aren’t likely to know much about eLearning, never mind training. Some SMEs are trainers, and this can often help, but by and large, SMEs are ordinary folks who happen to just know a lot about a particular subject.

When you think about the average eLearning project, it is often very time pressured and has a fairly narrow scope in terms of the knowledge and skills we wish to impart. That means from get go, SMEs have to take on a lot of rules in which to impart that knowledge. And most of us involved in learning know that once you put someone under pressure with lots of rules and caveats, it can stiffle communication.

Often SMEs are thrust into the fray because:

  1. No-one else wants to do it
  2. No-one else has time
  3. They didn’t know enough to say no! (or they had no choice)

Understanding where the SME is coming from is a vital first step in building a good relationship. To this end, working along with Dawn and Andrea, we’ve come up with a magnificent seven SME archetypes:

Magnificent 7 SME Archetypes

What we were aiming to do here is to help people think of the SME as someone that we should at least meet half-way. It is important to spend time understanding the SME’s pressures and how to work with them to make imparting their knowledge and insights as easy as possible. We’d argue that it is up to Instructional Designers, along with Project Managers to manage the eLearning development process in such a way that the SME is setup for success.

Everyone is a SME in this modern age!

At a quick glance, you might think we’ve been a bit harsh with the names of our SME archetypes. But on closer inspection, it is more subtle than that. Who hasn’t felt clueless, or unfocussed or a little bit control freakish from time to time on a project? Remember that feeling, because it will help you to help your SME.

However, in this networked world, we’d argue that getting ahead in the workplace is just as dependant on the knowledge and relationships in your network as it is on your own knowledge. A couple of weeks ago, I was interviewing two SMEs and it struck me that the types of precise, targeted questions that I was asking would actually serve me well in most business conversations. Are the skills I use for helping SMEs to impart their knowledge really just good communication and listening skills, and should I apply/practice them more widely?

So join us for #chat2lrn on Thursday September 24th, 8:00 PDT/11:00 EDT/16:00 BST. Can we leverage good SME communication skills to help all of our business relationships?

Storylistening versus Storytelling?

This week’s chat2lrn is a post from crew member Fiona Quigley, who works for Logicearth Learning Services based in Ireland. 

I just love stories; it was an integral part of my Irish upbringing – two Scottish grannies and family of singers tends to make it that way!

And over the last few years, I’ve had a bit of a hobby collecting stories. I’m not a great storyteller myself, but I do love to listen to others’ stories and to collect them. Over the last few years, I’ve collected more than 1500 women’s career stories. Some are short – a couple of paragraphs, while others go on and on for pages, reaching a eureka moment at the end.

This ‘hobby’ started off very innocently. I kept reading about the pay and gender gap, and also read various statistics about women’s prospects in the workplace. The so-called glass ceiling seemed as far off as ever. I sent a few emails to friends asking for their career stories and in particular to reflect on any transitions or decision points they encountered. These friends also kindly sent emails to other women and before I knew it, I was getting lots of stories from all over the world.

I’m lucky to know lots of strong, capable and ambitious women, so I was intrigued when many of the gender/pay statistics hadn’t seemed to have changed in the last 10 years. The decision points in the women’s stories ranged from going for their first promotion, getting married, to having children, and dealing with personal or family illness. All impacted their careers – some in a good way, some not so good.

The stories are precious to me, and I won’t ever share them but I have learned a lot from them.

So what did I learn?

Well often the most important storylistener needs to be ourselves. We go through day-to day life, almost automatically at times. We get caught up in our own and many other people’s narratives; the dutiful wife/husband, the diligent worker, the stressed out commuter and so on.

By narrative, I mean a set of related stories. We live our lives as an evolving set of lived experiences – or unfolding story. Sometimes it is hard to tell whether we are living the story or the story is living us! Due to on-going life and work pressures and the general busyness we get caught up in, often we flit from narrative to narrative either giving away our power or not realising what power we have to create better story endings for ourselves.

Many of the 1500+ women’s stories that I have collected so far, made this same point – they haven’t had the chance to sit down and collectively reflect or join the dots between all their career experiences to date. They’ve missed patterns and repeating bottlenecks, simply because they haven’t had a chance to listen to their own stories. Worse still, no-one else had listened to their story to help them confirm or validate it.

Which brings me to one of the often forgotten points about stories in general – we learn from others’ stories precisely because stories give us a chance to reflect on lived experience and join the dots in our own lives.

What has all this got to do with chat2lrn?

Stop rambling Fiona I hear you say! There is a point to this, I promise…

I wonder if, in the workplace, we helped others to pay attention to their own stories or narratives, would it make a difference to our workplace relationships and how we collaborate and share knowledge? What If we were able to just slow down or stop for a few minutes each week and ask each other to share a career story or how we overcame a difficult challenge? And no I’m not advocating tree-hugging or therapy for all, I’m just thinking about re-tuning the radio of our lives from busyness to a few moments of quiet reflection. If, according to the 70:20:10 model, we learn most from others, then surely listening to others’ stories has to be a part of that?

If you understand the concept of tacit knowledge, then it is easy to see that we all know more than we usually express. Giving our staff time and space to reflect is the first step on the way to freeing that knowledge. As a final example, I asked a colleague to reflect on what learning meant to them. I was writing a blog on workplace learning and I kind of knew what answer I wanted back (we all do that don’t we?), but I was blown away by her response. Helen is a keen mountaineer and reflected on learning like this:

MountainQuote

How many other rich answers are we missing from our colleagues just because we don’t give them time and space?

Getting more practical

I tried this exercise a while back with a few friends and I was surprised by how much they enjoyed it. They have since tried it in their own workplaces and have told me that it has improved some of their workplace relationships as well as revealing some interesting insights.

lunchtime-story2

Are your ears twitching?

So what do you think? Could you give this a go in the workplace? What might stop you? Join us this Thursday 21st May in chat2lrn to continue the discussion.

Revolutionize Learning and Development

#Chat2lrn is delighted to have a guest post from Clark Quinn. Clark Quinn, Ph.D., is a recognized leader in learning technology strategy, helping organizations take advantage of information systems to meet learning, knowledge, and performance needs. His approach is learning experience design, combining what we know about how people think and learn with comprehension of technology capabilities to meet real needs. He combines a deep background in cognitive science, a rich understanding of computer and network capabilities reinforced through practical application, considerable management experience, and a track record of strategic vision and successful innovations. He is a well regarded speaker and author on human performance technology directions. You can follow Clark on Twitter: @Quinnovator. See more of Clark’s views on this subject in his book Revolutionize Learning & Development.Revolutionize Learning & Development , Clark N. Quinn


 

Is Learning & Development achieving what it could and should? The evidence says no. Surveys demonstrate that most L&D groups acknowledge that they are not helping their organizations achieve their goals. It’s worse than the cobbler’s children, because they at least got others shoed, but here we’re not getting ourselves effective enough to help anyone else. Where are we falling apart?

My short answer is that we’re trying to use industrial age methods in an information age. Back then, one person thought for many and our training was to get people able to do rote tasks. There wasn’t a real need for knowledge work, and we were happy to filter out those who couldn’t succeed under these conditions. In this day and age knowledge work is most of what contributes to organizational success, and we want to foster it across the organization.

To succeed, there are a few things we need to get into alignment. The simple fact is that much of what is known about how we think, work, and learn isn’t being accounted for in L&D practices. We use courses to put information into the head, but there’s clear evidence that our thinking is distributed across information in the world. It’s also hard to get information into the head. So we should be focusing on putting as much information into the world as we can. We also now know that the way to get the best outcomes is to get people to work together, and that silos and hierarchies interfere. If we want the best outcomes, we want to facilitate people working and playing well together. Finally, we know that learning should involve models to guide performance, be emotionally engaging, and have sufficient, appropriate, and spaced practice. All of this is antithetical to so-called rapid elearning.

Underpinning this is the fact that we’re measuring the wrong things. We’re out of alignment with what the business needs; when we’re measuring how much it costs per seat per hour, we’re worrying about efficiency, and we’re paying no attention to effectiveness. It’s taken as a matter of faith that ‘if we build it, it is good’, and that’s empirically wrong.

Quite simply we need a revolution; a fundamental shift in what we value and what we do. It’s not redefining what we do completely; e.g. courses are still a viable tool, but they’re just one part of a bigger picture. There are two things organizations need: optimal execution of those things they know they need to be able to do, and continual innovation to adapt to the increasingly complex environment. Courses are only a part of the first, and essentially irrelevant to the latter. We need to incorporate performance support for one thing, and sponsoring innovation is about facilitating communication and collaboration. That comes from using social media (all of it, not just technology) in appropriate ways.

The upside is big. We can, and should, be the key to organizational outcomes. We should be designing and fostering a performance ecosystem where people can work in powerful ways. We should be shaping culture to get a workforce that is motivated and effective. If we do so, we’re as fundamental to organizational success as anything in the business. I suggest that this is an achievable goal and emphasize that it’s a desirable goal.

To get there, you need to ‘think different’. You need to shift from thinking about learning and training, and start thinking about performance. You need to take development to mean facilitation. L&D should be Performance & Development, or even Performance and Innovation. That’s the promise, and the opportunity. Are you ready to join the revolution? Your organization needs it.

Let’s discuss in #chat2lrn this week.  See you on Thursday, May 7th 8:00 am PDT / 11:00 am EDT / 4:00 pm BST.

The Business of Learning Evaluation

#Chat2lrn is delighted to have a guest post from @AjayPangarkar.  Ajay M. Pangarkar CTDP, CPA, CMA is founder of CentralKnowledge.com and LearningSourceonline.com. He is a renowned employee performance management expert and 3-time author most recently publishing the leading performance book, “The Trainer’s Balanced Scorecard: A Complete Resource for Linking Learning to Organizational Strategy” (Wiley 2009), award-wining assessment specialist with Training Magazine, and award-winning writer winning the 2014 prestigious TrainingIndustry.com Readership and Editors’ Awards for the Top 10 most read articles. Help him start a, “Workplace Revolution” at blog.centralknowledge.com.

Learning practitioners are under tremendous pressure from business leaders to demonstrate that their learning efforts and initiatives are worth the budget they allocate. This has to be one of most daunting challenges facing those involved with any aspect of workplace learning.

There are many reasons why learning practitioners are unable to connect their efforts with actual workplace applications. One that stands out is that learning practitioners focus on the “learning” rather than on how learning “results” impact business performance.

Reality Check

Learning practitioners like to talk about being ‘accountable’ but behind the talk is an unfortunate reality where, like the three monkeys, this pesky ‘accountability’ issue will go away if we do not speak, see, or hear it. What learning practitioners really want to say to business leaders is, “Leave us alone to focus on the learning and stop bothering us with your trivial business issues!”

Regretfully, many learning practitioners remain under the impression that if proper learning takes place then everything else will take care of itself. Intuitively, this makes some sense but this causal relationship is too weak to be effective. Following this logic is the same as saying that, if you eat ice cream you’ll be cold; possibly, but there are many other reasons that also apply.

“If proper learning takes place then everything else will take care of itself is similar to saying that if you eat ice cream you’ll be cold; possibly but many other reasons also apply.”

Those involved with learning discover early to integrate and apply Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels of Evaluation. Yes, your organization explicitly hires learning practitioners for their expertise with level 1 (develop effective learning) and level 2 (learning retention). There isn’t one business leader that expects anything different. What’s more, however, is that they also expect their learning practitioners to ensure that the first two levels contribute to improving job performance (level 3) that will lead to business improvement (level 4).

Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing

Here lays every Learning Practitioner’s challenge…getting employees to learn the right skills and, ultimately, apply these skills to the job, again, ‘accountability’. In an attempt to answer this need, there are those proposing what appears as relevant solutions to this dilemma including measuring learning’s “return on investment” (training ROI) and how well learning meets business expectations (ROE). Again, the shortsightedness of these methodologies is just like the analogy of “ice cream making you cold”. The causal relationship is too weak to prove and too often inappropriate or irrelevant.

These solutions fall short to actually measure and evaluate how well learning contributes to on-the-job effectiveness and its role to achieving business objectives. With a growing need for innovation, creativity, and managing continuous market changes, business leaders are also under tremendous pressure to foster a knowledge-driven business environment. Leaders are increasingly depending on organizational knowledge to develop a strategic and business advantage that will help them to maintain relevance, let alone survival, within their market space.

“Rather than being viewed as a secondary role, workplace learning has quickly risen to the top of many business leaders to-do list.”

Rather than being viewed as a secondary role, workplace learning has quickly risen to the top of many business leaders to-do list. Furthermore, even though this is a learning practitioners dream, it also comes at a price…the need for accountability. So, what should learning practitioners do? How can they prove that their learning efforts actually improve employee and business performance? Is there anything currently available that works?

Let’s discuss these and other related questions to measuring and evaluating workplace learning impact at our next online gathering of #chat2lrn, Thursday 27 November at 16:00 BST / 12:00 EDT / 09:00 PDT. Come prepared, we look forward to seeing you!