Catching the Wave

This week’s post comes from Dr. Greg Ketchum. Dr. Greg is a former clinical psychologist-turned CEO and media workplace and career coach. He presides over an executive talent firm, providing coaching and recruiting for executives and Fortune 500 companies. A unique mix of psychology and coaching expertise gives Dr. Greg a great understanding of people and what it takes for career success. You can find him at 
TalentPlanet® | www.talentplanet.com, and on Twitter @drgreg. You can also find him in his KPIX & KRON TV Workplace & Career Segments on YouTube and his Workplace and Career Talk Shows from CNET & XM Satellite Radio.


Catching the Wave:

How to Catch the Wave of Massive Change Happening in Enterprise Learning and Development

Catch

Summarized from webcast delivered with Andrew Bateman at Human Capital Institute July 14, 2015

View the PDF of Webcast slides here: Catch the Wave or Get Left Behind

Rapid Development of Learning Technology:

The rapid development of technology enabled learning is driving major changes in how learning happens inside the organization and in the role of the Learning Professional. This evolution is causing learning leaders to confront and examine a number of questions about the future direction of learning within their respective organizations. Here are some of the questions that we will examine today.

  1. Traditional Vision of the Role of Learning: The traditional view is that the learning
    function assesses the learning and skill development needs of the organization and
    then either creates or acquires the appropriate learning resources to fulfill those
    needs. In this view the business leaders and their business goals are the main
    customers of the learning function.
  2. Emergent Vision of the Role of Learning: The emergent view of learning is that your employees are your main customers and that the role of learning is to help them maximize their potential. It’s best summed up by these quotes from Bridge’s
    website.

    1. “Rather than shaping your employees into a particular mold that achieves an
      organizational goal, L&D now focuses on helping employees reach and discover their potential — it’s about growth and personal aspirations.”
    2. “L&D now focuses on helping employees with personal growth and aspiration.
      Developments in collaborative, blended, and social learning help make learning
      interesting, engaging, fun and continuous.”
  3. What is Your Vision? Given these two starkly different visions of learning what is
    your vision of the role that learning plays in your organization now and in the
    future? Without clarifying your vision of the role and goals of learning in your
    organization both now and in the future no amount of dazzling learning
    technology will help you. This is the bottom line.
  4. You’ve Got Your Vision and Goals: Now What? Once you’ve nailed down the
    vision and goals of learning how do you make those key decisions on what kinds of
    learning technology, content, and programs you’ll deploy to drive your goals?

    1. The Fundamentals of Learning: With all of the advances in learning technology it’s easy to lose sight of the enduring fundamentals of learning. That is, how does the best learning happen, what role does learning play in each of our lives, why do we seek learning, do we learn better alone or in interaction with others, etc. These questions aim to look at how we’ve evolved as creatures and what role learning has played in that evolution. If we didn’t learn that certain plants are poison, or that lightning can kill you, or other things like that we would have never survived as a species. From this perspective learning is what has kept us alive as individuals and a species and that suggests that the drive to learn is as strong as any other native drive such as for food or shelter. This is a rich and deep area to explore: How do we learn? Why do we learn?
      • Darwin quote……“I believe there exists, & I feel within me, an instinct for the truth, or knowledge or discovery, of something of the same nature as the instinct of virtue, & that our having such an instinct is reason enough for scientific researches without any practical results ever ensuing from them.” — Charles Darwin.
    2. Mix of Modalities: What mixture of technology, in-person, classroom, social,
      self-directed, crowd sourced, casual, on the job, and other learning modalities
      will you employ and for which groups and individuals?
    3. Laying the Ground Work: Before you bring in any new learning technology
      what ground work do you need to do to ensure that the solution you’ve chosen
      is right for your organization and that you’ve set yourself up for success?
    4. Realistic Expectations of Learning Technology: What can learning technology do and not do? What’s realistic to expect as to the benefits both to the individual and the organization from technology enabled learning? What role does human interaction still play as an essential element in learning?
    5. Leadership Development, Bench Strength, Succession Planning: If learning is increasingly becoming an end user, self-directed exercise how do you achieve your goals for these three areas?
  5. The Big Question Remains – Engagement: Given all we’ve discussed, one of the
    biggest questions remains as to how you get your employees to engage with any of
    your learning solutions whether they be technology, classroom, person-to-person,
    virtual, or group based?

    • Our View: Building an engaged audience for your learning solutions starts with
      having compelling content, and with understanding the natural role that
      learning plays for us as individual human beings. Without either those building
      an engaged learning audience just isn’t going to happen.

So, what do you all think? Do you agree with these steps as a process to “catch the wave” of change?

Join in and discuss these and other questions during #chat2lrn this week on 28 January, 2016 at 08.00 PST/11.00 EST /16.00 GMT. Hope to see you there!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s