Is This a Training Problem?

by Patti Shank, PhD

I was very lucky when I was a young training manager and had the opportunity to learn with Geary Rummler (http://www.performancedesignlab.com/geary-rummler-founder). I truly believe that this training greatly helped my performance over the lifetime of my career. It provided a certain way of doing my work. The resource I will share with you will provide a brief synopsis of some of the thinking involved that I hope will intrigue you.

Why Care About This?

Training is an expensive intervention. We only need to provide training for one reason: People need skills they don’t have (or need to upgrade or re-establish their skills) and it makes sense to provide it in a formalized way.

When there are problems, such as people unable to do their jobs because of inadequate tools or not enough feedback about whether they are performing as needed (no performance standards), those problems must be fixed and training won’t solve the problem.

Example: A manager asks for team training for her staff because they are don’t work well together. In reality, she causes problems among them by how she treats them. She favors some over others. She provides more work and overtime to people she doesn’t like as much. Training might help this but she is the one that needs it. And before that, she needs coaching about the problems she is causing so the training might be valuable to her.

When we get requests (or demands) for training and we don’t determine if training has a good chance of solving the problem (or being part of the solution), we are creating a problem, not solving it.  Why?

We are using resources that could be better put elsewhere.

We are removing people’s time (when they are stuck in training) that they could be using towards better purposes. They could be using that time to get work done.
The problem doesn’t get fixed. (Think of all the resources used to not solve the problem!)
We look foolish and are unprofessional, and frankly, this happens too often. Who would hire a carpenter who couldn’t measure or build the right solution?

How Training Doesn’t Work

Example: When someone asks for customer service training but they have insufficient tools to answer customer questions or their process requires multiple workarounds, adding customer service training is a misplaced and expensive intervention.  They may need some training (or not) but they DO need better tools and an improved process so customers aren’t angry about being put on indefinite hold or sent to the wrong department.

Carl Binder’s discussion of Gilbert’s Six Boxes is a great introduction to thinking about what we need to do to have the type of performance organizations need and what influences these performance outcomes in the workplace. Read it and think about what part each part plays in your work. If you don’t think it fits in L&D’s world, we’ll have to disagree.

The Six Boxes: http://www.binder-riha.com/sixboxes.pdf

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